About your son

Re “Regarding Henry” (Cover story, by Melissa Daugherty, March 19):
The CN&R’s cover story presents profound and deeply personal insights into the experience of being a parent of a child with Down syndrome. It’s a testament to the love and perseverance of family. 

In my late-twenties my wife taught in a classroom with a handful of K-3 students who were intellectually disabled. Autism, Down syndrome and mental retardation (yes, this term was in use in the 1980s).

I remember two of my ex-wife’s students, Robbie and Stacie, and the love and care she and her full-time aide provided for them in and out of the classroom. We would sometimes babysit, and the chatter in our house on assistance for her students was part of the daily routine. The proximity to the joy and pain—of child, parent and teacher—had a profound impact on me that continues unabated. 

Children like Henry are precious gifts providing daily inspiration by overcoming challenges like the little superheroes they are. Robbie and Stacie’s parents were always so proud of them, as I’m sure Melissa and Matt are of Henry. Bravo, Henry! 

Bill Mash
Chico

Our content is free, but not free to produce

If you value our local news, arts and entertainment coverage, become an CN&R supporter with a one-time or recurring donation. Help us keep our reporters at work, bringing you the stories that need to be told.

Donate to CN&R

$20,961 of $6,000 raised
$
Select Payment Method
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00 Monthly

These donations are not tax deductible. If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to our nonprofit fund, the Independent Journalism Fund, please click here.

About Melissa Daugherty 47 Articles
Melissa Daugherty is an award-winning columnist and editorial writer who started her career as a higher education reporter at a daily newspaper. Daugherty spent 13 years at the CN&R, seven as editor-in-chief. Comforting the afflicted and afflicting the comfortable is her super power.

1 Comment

  1. For those that are concerned about the needles why not take some of the money being used and hire some appropriately trained personnel to seek out the problem areas and removed the discarded needles together with a number concerned citizens could call if they spot discarded syringes

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*